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News

11the March 2015 - A ferret and Captain Corelli

Inspired by a ferret on lead in central London, member Peter Elliston accumulated a project ‘It’s a Strange World’, his take on the unexpectedly weird and wonderful. Most striking were his informal groups and portraits, including a fully and colourfully tattooed gent, spotted at Sidmouth Folk Festival, a small patch of arm yet undyed. A wonderful night shot of a fast food bar interior featured several couples totally engrossed in each others company – competition worthy. The possibly weird was emphasised by three mature travellers, dress reminiscent of hillbillies, with flowing beards and lifestyle hats. The obvious boss, a flat-capped, tattooed, and well built lady – don’t mess with me!

Peter’s second wind focussed on surreal composition, a route to learning Photoshop skills. Taking a lead from Dali landscapes, his skillfull assembly of melting clocks, stark tree, and mysterious dog proved a convincing result. The subliminal message escaped some or all, but there was no doubting his new-found abilities

Member Jon Peters followed with a whistle-stop tour of Kefalonia, the Greek island of Captain Corelli fame, hoping to capture some of the film’s atmosphere. The island and population suffered greatly from severe earthquakes, so graphic ruins from the fifties and later were very evident in his first shots. Admitting an aversion to tourist hotspots, Jon and family sought out the smaller, emptier, beaches to park their trademark bright green umbrella. The deep blue sea, emphasised by white beaches, was apparently surprisingly cold. The source, extensive freshwater cave systems with impressive majesty, now photographable by boat.

Towards the end of his show, Jon assembled the artistic images, including a hillside clothed in blue beehives, a cafe with table set for one, followed by a bored looking elderly man slumped on stone steps and clad in classic black and white, ‘waiting for his wife’. These conveyed the essence of the place most effectively, with no mandolin in sight.

Each talk was received with enthusiasm, generating much humour and banter among the audience, a tribute to the skills and application of these two accomplished members.