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News

23rd April 2014 - Competition evening 'Wildlife at Home'

There could have been no better person to judge the club’s ‘Wildlife at Home’ print competition than George Reekie, a member of the prestigious f8 group with considerable experience of taking photographs of birds and other animals in the wild and the winner of many awards.
47 prints were presented for his adjudication ranging from macro images of very small insects through to a range of images of various wild birds and larger animals such as deer and seals.
George was the first to admit that taking excellent wildlife image is not easy. He also pointed out that with the rise of digital photography and the opportunity for so many photographers to have the equipment to capture wildlife, competition winners had really got to be special. And so whilst highly competent pictures of robins, dragon fly or butterflies were given plenty of praise they were always going to come second to images which showed wildlife actually doing something.
Along the way George provided the club with many useful tips about how to do just this and stressed the importance of getting our images sharp and in particular the importance of the eyes in nature shots. One other useful tip was to view our images in different ways – such as considering the prints upside down – as this often gave a good indication of whether the composition was right. He even suggested that some of the images presented might appear better turned in a different direction as this often presented the subject in a more pleasing way.
The results of the competition were: Highly Commended – Rose Finch for ‘My family’ – a charming shot of a swan and her offspring; Nick Farnham for ‘Woody’ – a great shot of a woodpecker on a brick wall; 3rd Sue Howard for ‘Honeybee in Flight’ – a brilliantly caught shot of the bee approaching a flower head; 2nd Rachel Hutchings for a lovely study of a ‘Great Crested Grebe’ and 1st went to Paul Carter for ‘Feed me, feed me’ – a lively shot of starlings demanding food from their parent.